Eat & Greet: Twista

Welcome to the first ever Eat & Greet brought to you by the good people at Alexander B. Blum Attorney at Law and Fresh Content Society. We are excited to have an event with Chicago legend, Twista, at the Iconic Chicago restaurant, Mannys Deli.

If you’re looking to work with and engage a social media infuencer (or become a social media influencer) this is the event to come to. We’ll be sharing best practices and some legalities around working with an ambassador. Atendees should come hungry for a half sandwich, bowl of soup, and drink with a regular ticket, or splurge with a VIP ticket! VIP attendees should expect that upgraded food package, a photo with the Legend Twista, and some other goodies not mentioned.

This is a social media friendly event. Strongly encourage capturing content and sharing it to your social media channels. Make sure you tag @773999BLUM and @freshcontentsociety and use the hashtag #EatandGreet.

This event is not to be missed!

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#EatandGreet #Twista #FREEBLUM #773999BLUM #Freshcontentsociety #MannysDeli #Twista

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Ok, so the Synthcart was the second chiptune hardware I bought, actually it was a birthday present. 

It is wicked cool, it make sound come out of your TV, in all of the bit goodness.  I recommend the big blue numbered keyboard, it is actually called the kid’s controller.  I have used it with the video controller, (it is smaller and black and has small buttons), but it is not that great.  It is kind of hard to use, and sometimes I pressed the wrong button and it sucked…

 

I found one of mine at a thrift store for 79 cents!  The other one I had to buy on a “bid” site, and I won it.  It did not work that great, so I decided to take it apart.  It turns out there was a bunch of dust, dander and crap that was making it difficult for the buttons to press the contact points. It was pretty easy to do, it only took 15 minutes to do.  It was SOO much easier than opening and fixing a ps3 sixaxis. 

 

It now works great and can be a beatbox, and synth.  The only issue I would say I have is that the switches on the Atari 2600 Heavy Sixer, are somewhat temperamental so I may want to switches eventually…

 

You can use the switches to change arpeggio, temp, beatbox/synth, and more.. It is a blast to use..

In this video I sampled the Nintendo DSI sounds into the MPC 1000 for sampling purposes. This can apply to sampling anything, and making a program of said samples…

Video  —  Posted: December 12, 2013 in Uncategorized

Honestly, replacing ram is one of the easier ways to upgrade a computer, drum machine, or other device. Typically, there are slots where the RAM can only go in one way. Some RAM chips you slide in and have plastic tabs on the side that snap into the RAM edge. Other RAM you angle in, and then snap it in. This video shows you how to add RAM to an Akai MPC 4000 drum machine. It is pretty easy, and RAM specifically for it can be found online.

Video  —  Posted: November 5, 2013 in Uncategorized
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So, to make a long story short. Dealing with hard drives for drum machines can be terrible.

I had bought an Akai MPC 4000 on craigslist years ago. It was sick, there were chiptunes, hard hitting drum beats, strange shit and so on.

I knew I wanted to back everything up so begins the journey.

I tried putting a USB flash drive on the front USB. It recognized it, but the device would not allow me to save to the flash drive, even though there was enough space. ( The MPC 4K seems to like loading samples from the USB instead of saving to it)

Next, I tried hooking the 4k USB on the back to my PC. I don’t fully remember what it did, but I know I couldn’t get anything to transfer.

I then tried hooking it up to my macbook, and download the akai.sys http://www.akaipro.com/mpc4000 , which did connect. I was able to see the files, however, I could not figure out how to copy the files over to the mac. So, after a while, I figured it would not let me do such things.

I thought I tried to diligently get the samples off my hard disk, and boy was I wrong.

About a month ago, I tried turning on the 4K and I noticed something was a miss. The device turned on, however it would not load properly, and there was an audible sound coming from the hard drive. My heart sank, I knew the hard drive had severe issues. I hoped that I could try turning off the machine and turn it back on and get it working. Unfortunately not. The hard drive died completely. There was some kind of beeping every couple seconds.

I tried and tried to get the hard drive working, but either the head is off the track or the head is not reading. I looked into a few different options for hard drive recovery, but they were all too much money. Although, there is a promising lead on reddit for no charge….

Anywho, I delved into my selection of older hard drives, and found a 3.5 IDE 60 gb older hard drive from a former computer. This was an obvious choice, as it was from a family computer, free and working.

I had to find a USBto IDE cable and power adapter, which powers the hard drive and converts the IDE to USB so the computer can read and edit the hard disk. I finally got the hard drive working, however it had to be fat 32 for the 4k to read the disk. I am using a Windows 7 laptop, and apparently it will no longer do FAT 32 formats, and the partitions can only be a certain size. I think it is 32 gb?

I tried a few programs for formatting hard disks, and I had a few issues getting it to work. First it was formatted wrong. Then I tried to plug it into the 4k and have the machine format it, but that was having issues as well. I finally settled on the smaller drive so it wouldn’t have to have more than one partition (although maybe that wouldn’t have been a problem) I managed to place folders of drum kits on the hard disk and then I installed it into the 3k. It has a single power plug and the IDE cable that is attached to the motherboard. It is very simply to remove and install the IDE hard disk once the 4k is opened.

I started opening the folders, and loading them, and then creating new programs for the 4k. You have to create a new program first and then you can start saving a program. More on this later.

Bottom line:

Next time I get a 4k or other disk based system, I will probably physically take out the hard drive, and copy everything to an external disk, as well as a flash drive or DVD, so if this happens again, I don’t have to worry….

This whole ordeal, took a huge amount of time, and frustrated me immensely. If I had just taken my own advice, I could have just forgotten about the disk, and put a new one in!

Interviews

Posted: August 21, 2012 in Uncategorized

I just found a decent interview page from Guitar Center, saw the RUN DMC page, and saw many others, so here is a link!

Interviews

This was a cool little project that I set up. I used the camera connection set to USB, with a USB midi cable for your computer, and VOILA! It worked nicely. I was able to control my Akai MPC 1000 via MIDI! I used the MIDI out and plugged it into the AKAI MPC 1000 MIDI in. Now, the pads were not as supple as the 1000, but it was nice to have it work. I imagine there are many other amazing tricks you can do with this setup. With the right software on the iPad, I aimagine anything is possible.

Next, I would like to see if I can use the 1000 to control General Midi on the iPad!